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BiographyEdit

Thutmose IV was born to Amenhotep II and Tiaa but was not actually the crown prince and Amenhotep II's chosen successor to the throne. Some scholars speculate that Thutmose ousted his older brother in order to usurp power and then commissioned the Dream Stele in order to justify his unexpected kingship. Thutmose's most celebrated accomplishment was the restoration of the Sphinx at Giza and subsequent commission of the Dream Stele

Thutmose IV
Human Mummy
[[File:
220px-Thutmosis IV mummy head
|210px|]]
Biographical Information
Name(s) Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV (meaning Thoth bore him)
Age Unknown
Sex Male
Status 18th-dynasty king of ancient Egypt
Height n/a
Source
Culture Ancient Egyptian
Date(s) Died approx: 1391 or 1388 BC
Site Valley of Kings
Current Location
Location KV43
Catalog #
==

==Mummification Mummification is one of the defining customs in ancient Egyptian society for people today. The practice of preserving the human body is believed to be a quintessential feature of Egyptian life. Yet even mummification has a history of development and was accessible to different ranks of society in different ways during different periods. There were at least three different processes of mummification according to Herodotus. They range from "the most perfect" to the method employed by the "poorer classes"

Thutmose IV was buried in the Valley of the Kings, in tomb KV43, but his body was later moved to the mummy cache in KV35, where it was discovered by Victor Loret in 1898. An examination of his body shows that he was very ill and had been wasting away for the final months of his life prior to his death. He was succeeded to the throne by his son, Amenhotep III. (1.)

StudiesEdit

PathologyEdit

Recently a surgeon at Imperial College London analysed the early death of Thutmose IV and the premature deaths of other Eighteenth dynasty Pharaohs (including Tutankhamun and Akhenaten). He concludes that their early deaths were likely as a result of a familial temporal epilepsy. This would account for both the untimely death of Thutmose IV and also his religious vision described on the Dream Stele, due to this type of epilepsy’s association with intense spiritual visions and religiosity.

Additional InfoEdit

External LinksEdit

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Pharaoh-Thutmose-IV https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thutmose_IV

ReferencesEdit

  1. Ashrafian, Hutan. "Familial epilepsy in the pharaohs of ancient Egypt's eighteenth dynasty". Epilepsy Behav25: 23–31. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2012.06.014

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