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Djed-Hapi
Human Mummy
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Biographical Information
Name(s) Djed-Hapi
Age Lived into his 50's
Sex Male
Status Member of the Ptolemaic Kingdom
Height Unknown
Source
Culture Ptolemaic (Egyptian and Greek)
Date(s) Ptolemaic Period (305-30 CE)
Site Unknown
Current Location
Location University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
Catalog #

BiographyEdit

Djed-Hapi dates back to the Ptolemaic period (305-30 CE). He was part of the Ptolemaic Kingdom which was ruled by the Ptolemaic dynasty, a Greek royal family. It is believed that Djed-Hapi lived into his 50's, with an unknown cause of death. He is currently located at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, where he is part of the "Secrets and Science" gallery.  

MummificationEdit

The mummy was wrapped in linen bands after the brain and organs were removed. Djed-Hapi was x-rayed in 1980, and again in 2016, which exhibited some details about his mummification. His head is cleanly detached from his body, and this is due to the mummification, not his death, as it seems intentional. This detachment is most likely attributed to the fact that during the Ptolelmaic period, brains of the deceased began to be removed from the base of the skull, rather than through the nose, which is why his naval cavity is intact. Despite some fraying of the external linen wrappings, Djed Hapi's body has been kept in rather good condition; all of his finger and toe bones are present, along with some preserved soft tissue. However, the only exception to this is that he has a large gap between the distal end of his shin bones and ankle bones, requiring his body to be handled carefully. 

StudiesEdit

No further studies to this date.

PathologyEdit

There is no information about signs of tooth decay, dental abcesses, diseases and etc. 


Additional InfoEdit

Djed-Hapi has recently undergone a conservation treatment in June 2016, as some linen wrappings were frayed or loose. The process consisted of the linen bands and pins being carefully removed, followed by humidifying and flattening the linens to get rid of any folds or creases. Lastly, the linen bands were wrapped around the body and adhered using Japanese tissue and a methylcellulose/water mixture, which acted like glue.  

Additional PhotosEdit

ReferencesEdit

https://www.penn.museum/sites/artifactlab/2016/06/27/treating-djed-hapis-wrappings/

https://www.penn.museum/sites/artifactlab/2016/05/03/say-hello-to-djed-hapi/

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